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“I am a rebellious and genuine woman who hates failure” — Assala Nasri on Overcoming Personal Challenges

Syrian singing sensation Assala Nasri is articulate, spontaneous, bold, and outspoken. After overcoming personal challenges, now, more than ever, she is touching her fans with her voice and art

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala Nasri wears dress, Nicolas Jebran; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

It has been 10 years since my last interview with the Syrian singer Assala Nasri for the occasion of a new record release. In that first meeting, she seemed so spontaneous and frank; unbreakable, strong, assertive, and sensitive. While a decade has passed, it seems like yesterday. Nothing has changed – Nasri is the same as always.

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The singer reveals that it was Lebanese designer Nicolas Jebran who convinced her to embark on this journey with Vogue Arabia and star on the third anniversary cover. It is no secret that Nasri and Jebran have a special relationship. He refers to her as, “A shining star. A happy, rebellious, capricious, and positive spirit who never surrenders and who removes obstacles with her music.” Commenting on the cover shoot, Nasri says, “When I saw the first photo, I forgot how tired I was during my travels to Marrakech. Hassan Hajjaj creates genuine art. I have never posed for a photographer like him. He is a real artist and cares so much about every detail to create his unique photos.”

Also Read: 24 Times Assala Proved Arab Designers Rule Her Wardrobe and the Stage

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala Nasri wears dress, Nicholas Jebran; hat, gloves, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

The singer continues the conversation with her musings on fame and reveals that she often considers that it could leave her at any time. “My fame is tied to my voice. I don’t know when God will deprive me of it,” she shares. And so, she tries to keep her life as a woman separate from her life as a star, though she admits to seldom succeeding. Nasri doesn’t deny that she enjoys fans’ love while on stage, but with the people close to her, she lives like anyone else. “Although fame gives everything, I hate it and hate to be governed by its details,” she asserts. “When something bad happens in my life, I will exert more effort and become more resilient. I am a rebellious and genuine woman who hates failure.”

00:00 / 00:00

When Nasri announced her divorce from Palestinian-American director and producer Tarek El Eryan on Instagram, she expressed her grief without mentioning the reasons for the split. She believes that divorce is a personal issue, one that no one has the right to comment on, especially as it is not related to her alone. Her divorce was an ordeal, and perhaps her crying on stage in Saudi Arabia is unmistakable evidence of that. She doesn’t know if her tears were due to her frustration or because she felt safe in the Kingdom, where she feels a deep connection. “Saudi people made my intellectual being. I feel I truly belong to this country that supported me from the beginning.”

“I am a rebellious and genuine woman who hates failure.”

Whatever the reason for her crying, her tears were the truest expression of her grief. After 14 years of marriage, she lost her partner, the father of her two children, and the love of her life. Today, she tries to look at things with a new light. “We were 90% positive during our marriage, and I will never forget this phase. Our separation does not mean that we deny the achievement we made together. Tarek and I formed a successful and fun couple, and we both decided on divorce.” She refuses to talk about the possibility of reconciliation, offering, “I am still exhausted. I cannot be honest in this matter.” She has not yet recovered from the divorce. “I would say one thing to Tarek: ‘I have always confessed to you that I need a father in my life and you had promised me that I will be your child for the rest of my life even if it is impossible that we live together. You didn’t fulfill your promise when we separated.’” She asks, “Why couldn’t I play the role of a real child in Tarek’s life?”

Assala Nasri wears coat, Miu Miu; shirt, Gucci; skirt, Christopher Kane; hat, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; shoes, photographer’s own. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Recovering quickly, Nasri explains, “Despite all the loss, I gained myself.” She reveals that she now takes more care of her appearance, health, femininity, and fashion. In the past, she devoted much time and effort looking after every minor detail of her husband’s life. The A-list singer starts to talk about women in general, affirming that she supports all, including the oppressed, battered, successful, and persistent women, and above all, mothers. However, she expresses concern for the workload of career women, explaining, “In performing this social duty, the working woman is subject to a bigger dose of oppression, as going out to work requires double the effort; she has to work inside and outside the home. Thus, her attention for herself is weakened; she even loses so much of her human rights along the way.” She emphasizes once again women’s right to take care of themselves, their health, and to live their lives and femininity to the fullest. “If I had to do it all over again, I would look after myself more. I have paid no attention to myself for too long.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala wears coat, Dries Van Noten; shirt, Gucci; pants, photographer’s own; shoes, Tom Ford; tights, Swedish Stockings. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Now, following the divorce, Nasri lives in Egypt. She considers it her homeland, as her children were born there, and she wants her twins to be close to their father. Her four children remain her top priority and she is keen on the time she spends with them. “I’m a celebrity and that puts me under heavy social pressures. I love to spend time with my kids without interruption. Unfortunately, that is almost impossible.” She makes sure to follow up with their school, as she wants them to receive a higher education. “I gave my daughter Sham absolute freedom because she is now a mature, educated, and trusted person,” she explains. “I let her find her own way into a personal and professional life. And that is what I will do with all my kids. I’m not going to impose my own rules on them; never ever.”

“If I had to do it all over again, I would look after myself more. I have paid no attention to myself for too long.”

Having talked extensively about her character, ethos, failures, and successes, the star is excited to talk about art. “I hate kitsch; music should refine the soul and promote ethics. I feel proud having real artists like Nawal Al-Kuwaitia, Mona Zaki, and Angham among us. I respect these names and appreciate their ethics both personally and artistically.”

Of her personal song choices, she shares, “I like sad tunes. However happy I feel, I opt for sad songs.” Nasri has in the past invited others to share in selecting songs with her, including her brother Anas, her business manager, and finally El Eryan, who jointly selected many songs, including her greatest hits “Ya Majnoun,” “Alli Jara,” “Samehtak,” and “Mabaash Ana.” However, she wasn’t always pleased with their choices, admitting, “I presented so many songs that I’m not convinced of. They neither resemble me nor express my principles, like “Kabartak Ala Sedak,” among others. They make me feel ashamed, so I close my eyes when performing them.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala wears shirt, Versace; skirt, scarf, Ferragamo; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

As for her many fans, Nasri communicates with them through social media, particularly Twitter as it allows her to become closer to them. “These platforms grant me the feeling of rapture. I like being flattered and pampered. This is who I am since I was seven years old. I used to be surrounded with care and love since I was in my home country, Syria. Since childhood, I’ve been so fond of hearing words of praise, especially concerning my voice and talent.” Nasri was born to Syrian artist Mustafa Nasri, and loved art from an early age. She started singing at four and presented programs and songs for children. Her breakthrough came with the release of her first album, Law Taaarafou, in 1993.

Today, if some people look to use circumstances in her life to build unfounded assumptions, she retorts, “I hate analyzing between the lines. In expressing any situation or a point of view, I opt to do so directly.” Despite being bold and spontaneous, Nasri upholds forgiveness. “Apology is an often-seen feature of honesty and spontaneity. I make a lot of mistakes, so I have to apologize.” She continues, “All my human relations are built on emotions. My life is like karma, and investing in others is the most important investment in my life. One day, we reap what we sow, be it good or bad.”

Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia

Photography Hassan Hajjaj 
Style Katie Trotter & Lisa Jarvis
Creative producer Laura Prior  
Art accomplice Ebon Heath 
Second assistant Tariq Hajjaj
Local producer Marie Courtin 
Hair Sadek Lardjane 
Makeup Jo Frost
Photography assistants Hasnae El Quarga and Meriem Yin
Style assistant Alexandria Lefevre 
Runner Yazid Bezaz, Abdelali Boukrimi, Mohammed Ajib
Studio Riad Yima, Marrakech
With special thanks to Four Seasons Resort Marrakech

Read Next: Vogue Arabia Celebrates Third Anniversary With Three Middle Eastern Legends

Journey Through Jaipur, the ‘Pink City’, in Celebration of This Season’s Buzziest Color

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Hello, Jaipur! This summer, Vogue Arabia—and a team of Indian and Arab creatives—took over the streets of the ‘Pink City’ in celebration of the season’s most adored hue. Join Sawai Padmanabh Singh, the Maharaja of Jaipur, rising models Nour Rizk from Lebanon, and Maumita from India on this journey, dripping with love for the color, the culture, and above all, the fashion.

Fashion director: Amine Jreissati
Videography: Gorkey Patwal, Pulkit Karla
Hair and makeup: Kritika Gill
Production: Ankita Chandra, Sam Allison
On-ground production: Film and Locations India, Mithika Gaekwad, Harshaeta Singh
Models: Nour Rizk, Maumita

Get Ready with Salma Abu Deif for Her First Cannes Film Festival Red Carpet

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Before making her first-ever red carpet appearance at Cannes Film Festival, Salma Abu Deif gave Vogue Arabia an exclusive sneak peek behind her look. The Egyptian actor opted for a bold black dress by Pinko, paired with glittering Chopard jewelry, while her beauty look featured sleek hair and a bright red pout.

Watch the video above as Abu Deif shows us how she got ready for the big day.

Production: Koral Communication

Amina Muaddi, Huda Kattan, and Nadine Nassib Njeim in Conversation with Manuel Arnaut

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Behind the scenes of our March 2022 cover was the usual bustle of a Vogue shoot combined with the thrill of our 5th anniversary, which only increased twofold as the three cover stars sat down for a conversation with Manuel Arnaut. The editor-in-chief spoke to accessories designer Amina Muaddi, beauty mogul Huda Kattan, and actor Nadine Nassib Njeim about growing up Arab, the struggles they overcame as women in their industries, what their incredible success feels like, and much more.

Keeping with the celebration of Middle Eastern women representing the region on a global stage in our latest issue, Arnaut began by asking Kattan what makes Arab women unique. “Having grown up outside the Middle East and moving here later on, I was so amazed by the strength and creativity in Arab women,” said the Iraqi-US entrepreneur. “I actually find them to be so passionate and so creative.” Nassib Njeim said, “Now, Arab women are more dedicated to their goals. They want to achieve their dreams. They don’t accept boundaries anymore even though they respect the culture, traditions, and religion. They are proving themselves in many, many fields.” Having lived outside of the Middle East for the majority of her life, Muaddi shared that people were often curious about her heritage. “Usually people are surprised and find it different that I am half-Jordanian-half -Romanian and work in fashion,” she said. “I am so connected to Italy and France but still very very rooted where I come from.”

The world has witnessed the three women achieve great heights in their careers, however, they reveal that a grounded mindset is key to prospering. “Maintaining a scrappy, self-starting type of attitude is very important to get things done,” advises Kattan, who feels only gratitude for her community upon seeing herself in beauty stores across the world. Muaddi adds that she still feels excited when stars including Rihanna, Beyoncé, and Kim Kardashian, wear her shoes. She says, “It’s fundamental to keep that excitement, to keep feeling like you still haven’t achieved what you wanted to, and to be grateful for what you have.” Nassib Njeim, whose moving performances in TV and cinema have touched and inspired so many over the years, shares that she keeps on challenging herself. “When you work with passion, and you have big dreams, and still consider that you are learning, you will always give your best,” she says.

The conversation takes a deep dive into some of the more challenging times in their lives, such as when Nassib Njeim underwent seven hours of surgery due to the Beirut port blast.”Now I’m more attached to my life, to my kids, and to making my dreams come true,” she says when asked about how the tragic incident changed her. The cover stars also discuss living their public lives, how they deal with hate, the best part about being themselves, and their goals for the next five years.

Watch the video above for the full conversation.

Inside Vogue Arabia’s Biggest Issue Ever Celebrating Our 5th Anniversary

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What better way to celebrate our 5th anniversary than by producing our biggest issue ever with 500 pages, and packing them with inspiring and empowering content? Vogue Arabia’s March 2022 issue holds the deeply personal cover stories of three powerhouse Arab women: Amina Muaddi, Huda Kattan, and Nadine Nassib Njeim, and the theme of Arab women taking charge and representing the region on a world stage.

The anniversary issue features conservationist Dame Jane Goodall in conversation with sustainability editor-at-large Livia Firth, talking about why there are still reasons to hope in a world filled with uncertainty. In another inspiring feature, lifelong friends Farida Khelfa and Carla Bruni model the latest couture, while French actor Philippine Leroy-Beaulieu – the iconic Emily in Paris villain – further defies age conventions while showcasing the season’s most striking looks. The edition also salutes Aquazzura on its 10th year in a special shoot with Princess Maria-Olympia of Greece and Denmark, and includes celebratory stories about fashion, entrepreneurs, rising stars, and the region’s biggest talents. Along with all that, the March 2022 issue also shines a spotlight on the new Saudi musicians to listen to now, while model and social entrepreneur Elisa Sednaoui Dellal finally finds her way home to Egypt after two years of a pandemic-enforced separation, in a moving feature where she visits, for the first time ever, one of her architect father’s most personal projects. 

Discover all this and much more in a special teaser video of the issue above, set to the catchy new track ‘Ala Bali’ by Palestinian singer Elyanna, who is also featured in the issue.

Watch Emirati Entrepreneur Salama Mohamed Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Vintage Rolex to Her First Louboutins

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We all have a few treasures in our wardrobes that have either seen the worst and best parts of our lives, have taken a great deal of saving up, or were purchases to come out of a ‘treat yourself’ moment. Whatever the story behind a piece may be, it needs to be told, and what better way than to have them take the spotlight in Vogue Arabia’s brand new video series, ‘My Style Superstars’?

First up, Emirati CEO and founder of skincare brand Peacefull, Salama Mohamed sits down to reveal the four items closest to her heart. Bringing out her vintage Rolex watch she says, “It’s very very old. When I saw it, I bought it for my birthday. One day I’m going to give it to my daughter.” The mother-of-two goes on to share that she gifted herself a pair of black Christian Louboutin pumps after giving birth to her son Khalifa. “It just gave me confidence and the feeling that I can do everything with a nice pair of Louboutins,” she confides. Mohamed also owns two special handbags with significant memories attached to them: a monogrammed Goyard, and a brown Hermès. Watch the video above to know the stories behind them, and stay tuned for more episodes from the series.

Watch Diala Makki Reveal Her Style Superstars, from Her Late Grandmother’s Necklace to a Bisht By Stéphane Rolland

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In the latest episode of ‘My Style Superstars’, TV presenter and journalist Diala Makki takes Vogue Arabia through the most cherished items in her closet.

Proving the power of jewelry that has passed through generations, the first piece revealed by Makki is a gold necklace that is over 100 years old. “I only wear it when I want some positive energy or when I’m about to venture into something new, and I want the protection of my grandmother, may she rest in peace,” confides Makki. The second item—a Class of 2021 cap from her third graduation—comes with an inspiring message from Makki, who completed her second master’s degree, in leadership in media. “It has been a wonderful achievement for myself,” shares Makki. “I really advise all women during different stages in their careers to go back to school. It’s very difficult for them to go back to that sense of discipline, but it taught me a lot, and I think I’m a completely different woman after I graduated.” The third piece is a special bisht with gold threads that was designed by Makki’s friend and renowned designer Stéphane Rolland. “I wore this bisht once, and it is very very dear to me because it was gifted by him,” says the presenter.

Watch the video above for more on what makes these items so special to Makki, and stayed tuned for more episodes.

Watch Zainab Al-Eqabi Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Graduation Gift to Her Mother’s Necklace

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In the next episode of ‘My Style Superstars’, Zainab Al-Eqabi reveals her wardrobe’s most prized possessions, some of which happen to be gifts given at the most important points in her life.

First up, the para-athlete and presenter brings out her mother’s necklace which once belonged to her grandmother, and was later split into different pieces to be shared with her siblings. “It’s nice to know that I have the same necklace as my sisters,” she shares. Al-Eqabi also holds another jewelry piece gifted by her mother close to her heart. Given to her before she embarked on a year-long master’s course in the UK, the ring features the kahraman stone and served as a reminder of her mother while she was away from home. Al-Eqabi’s next item is sure to strike a chord with all those who have special memories of their first solo travel. Bought at a local Parisian shop during one of her first trips to the city, the bag marked a moment of celebration for Al-Eqabi’s independence. Al-Eqabi treated herself to another bag growing up—this time, after completing her master’s degree, “to tell myself that women should dream, and work hard to achieve their goals.”

Watch the video above to hear all the stories attached to the sentimental pieces in Al-Eqabi’s closet.

March 9, 2020

“I am a rebellious and genuine woman who hates failure” — Assala Nasri on Overcoming Personal Challenges

Syrian singing sensation Assala Nasri is articulate, spontaneous, bold, and outspoken. After overcoming personal challenges, now, more than ever, she is touching her fans with her voice and art

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala Nasri wears dress, Nicolas Jebran; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

It has been 10 years since my last interview with the Syrian singer Assala Nasri for the occasion of a new record release. In that first meeting, she seemed so spontaneous and frank; unbreakable, strong, assertive, and sensitive. While a decade has passed, it seems like yesterday. Nothing has changed – Nasri is the same as always.

00:00 / 00:00

The singer reveals that it was Lebanese designer Nicolas Jebran who convinced her to embark on this journey with Vogue Arabia and star on the third anniversary cover. It is no secret that Nasri and Jebran have a special relationship. He refers to her as, “A shining star. A happy, rebellious, capricious, and positive spirit who never surrenders and who removes obstacles with her music.” Commenting on the cover shoot, Nasri says, “When I saw the first photo, I forgot how tired I was during my travels to Marrakech. Hassan Hajjaj creates genuine art. I have never posed for a photographer like him. He is a real artist and cares so much about every detail to create his unique photos.”

Also Read: 24 Times Assala Proved Arab Designers Rule Her Wardrobe and the Stage

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala Nasri wears dress, Nicholas Jebran; hat, gloves, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

The singer continues the conversation with her musings on fame and reveals that she often considers that it could leave her at any time. “My fame is tied to my voice. I don’t know when God will deprive me of it,” she shares. And so, she tries to keep her life as a woman separate from her life as a star, though she admits to seldom succeeding. Nasri doesn’t deny that she enjoys fans’ love while on stage, but with the people close to her, she lives like anyone else. “Although fame gives everything, I hate it and hate to be governed by its details,” she asserts. “When something bad happens in my life, I will exert more effort and become more resilient. I am a rebellious and genuine woman who hates failure.”

00:00 / 00:00

When Nasri announced her divorce from Palestinian-American director and producer Tarek El Eryan on Instagram, she expressed her grief without mentioning the reasons for the split. She believes that divorce is a personal issue, one that no one has the right to comment on, especially as it is not related to her alone. Her divorce was an ordeal, and perhaps her crying on stage in Saudi Arabia is unmistakable evidence of that. She doesn’t know if her tears were due to her frustration or because she felt safe in the Kingdom, where she feels a deep connection. “Saudi people made my intellectual being. I feel I truly belong to this country that supported me from the beginning.”

“I am a rebellious and genuine woman who hates failure.”

Whatever the reason for her crying, her tears were the truest expression of her grief. After 14 years of marriage, she lost her partner, the father of her two children, and the love of her life. Today, she tries to look at things with a new light. “We were 90% positive during our marriage, and I will never forget this phase. Our separation does not mean that we deny the achievement we made together. Tarek and I formed a successful and fun couple, and we both decided on divorce.” She refuses to talk about the possibility of reconciliation, offering, “I am still exhausted. I cannot be honest in this matter.” She has not yet recovered from the divorce. “I would say one thing to Tarek: ‘I have always confessed to you that I need a father in my life and you had promised me that I will be your child for the rest of my life even if it is impossible that we live together. You didn’t fulfill your promise when we separated.’” She asks, “Why couldn’t I play the role of a real child in Tarek’s life?”

Assala Nasri wears coat, Miu Miu; shirt, Gucci; skirt, Christopher Kane; hat, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; shoes, photographer’s own. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Recovering quickly, Nasri explains, “Despite all the loss, I gained myself.” She reveals that she now takes more care of her appearance, health, femininity, and fashion. In the past, she devoted much time and effort looking after every minor detail of her husband’s life. The A-list singer starts to talk about women in general, affirming that she supports all, including the oppressed, battered, successful, and persistent women, and above all, mothers. However, she expresses concern for the workload of career women, explaining, “In performing this social duty, the working woman is subject to a bigger dose of oppression, as going out to work requires double the effort; she has to work inside and outside the home. Thus, her attention for herself is weakened; she even loses so much of her human rights along the way.” She emphasizes once again women’s right to take care of themselves, their health, and to live their lives and femininity to the fullest. “If I had to do it all over again, I would look after myself more. I have paid no attention to myself for too long.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala wears coat, Dries Van Noten; shirt, Gucci; pants, photographer’s own; shoes, Tom Ford; tights, Swedish Stockings. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Now, following the divorce, Nasri lives in Egypt. She considers it her homeland, as her children were born there, and she wants her twins to be close to their father. Her four children remain her top priority and she is keen on the time she spends with them. “I’m a celebrity and that puts me under heavy social pressures. I love to spend time with my kids without interruption. Unfortunately, that is almost impossible.” She makes sure to follow up with their school, as she wants them to receive a higher education. “I gave my daughter Sham absolute freedom because she is now a mature, educated, and trusted person,” she explains. “I let her find her own way into a personal and professional life. And that is what I will do with all my kids. I’m not going to impose my own rules on them; never ever.”

“If I had to do it all over again, I would look after myself more. I have paid no attention to myself for too long.”

Having talked extensively about her character, ethos, failures, and successes, the star is excited to talk about art. “I hate kitsch; music should refine the soul and promote ethics. I feel proud having real artists like Nawal Al-Kuwaitia, Mona Zaki, and Angham among us. I respect these names and appreciate their ethics both personally and artistically.”

Of her personal song choices, she shares, “I like sad tunes. However happy I feel, I opt for sad songs.” Nasri has in the past invited others to share in selecting songs with her, including her brother Anas, her business manager, and finally El Eryan, who jointly selected many songs, including her greatest hits “Ya Majnoun,” “Alli Jara,” “Samehtak,” and “Mabaash Ana.” However, she wasn’t always pleased with their choices, admitting, “I presented so many songs that I’m not convinced of. They neither resemble me nor express my principles, like “Kabartak Ala Sedak,” among others. They make me feel ashamed, so I close my eyes when performing them.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Assala Nasri. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Assala wears shirt, Versace; skirt, scarf, Ferragamo; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

As for her many fans, Nasri communicates with them through social media, particularly Twitter as it allows her to become closer to them. “These platforms grant me the feeling of rapture. I like being flattered and pampered. This is who I am since I was seven years old. I used to be surrounded with care and love since I was in my home country, Syria. Since childhood, I’ve been so fond of hearing words of praise, especially concerning my voice and talent.” Nasri was born to Syrian artist Mustafa Nasri, and loved art from an early age. She started singing at four and presented programs and songs for children. Her breakthrough came with the release of her first album, Law Taaarafou, in 1993.

Today, if some people look to use circumstances in her life to build unfounded assumptions, she retorts, “I hate analyzing between the lines. In expressing any situation or a point of view, I opt to do so directly.” Despite being bold and spontaneous, Nasri upholds forgiveness. “Apology is an often-seen feature of honesty and spontaneity. I make a lot of mistakes, so I have to apologize.” She continues, “All my human relations are built on emotions. My life is like karma, and investing in others is the most important investment in my life. One day, we reap what we sow, be it good or bad.”

Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia

Photography Hassan Hajjaj 
Style Katie Trotter & Lisa Jarvis
Creative producer Laura Prior  
Art accomplice Ebon Heath 
Second assistant Tariq Hajjaj
Local producer Marie Courtin 
Hair Sadek Lardjane 
Makeup Jo Frost
Photography assistants Hasnae El Quarga and Meriem Yin
Style assistant Alexandria Lefevre 
Runner Yazid Bezaz, Abdelali Boukrimi, Mohammed Ajib
Studio Riad Yima, Marrakech
With special thanks to Four Seasons Resort Marrakech

Read Next: Vogue Arabia Celebrates Third Anniversary With Three Middle Eastern Legends

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