Follow Vogue Arabia

“Independence is everything” — Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi on Shaping the Artistic Legacy of Sharjah with Courage and Vision

Hard-working and passionate, Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi is shaping the artistic legacy of Sharjah – and her brother – with courage and vision…

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears jumper, Sheikha Hoor’s own; dress, socks, shoes, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; earrings, rings, Sohail Abdullah. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Tick, tick, tick, tick. “Done. My meeting in Sharjah is pushed back and now I can stay one more day,” pronounces Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi, her long, white-painted nails swiping the screen of her phone. Busier than ever, the Emirati royal is in Marrakech for our cover shoot, after spending more than a month in Pakistan, where she curated the second edition of the Lahore Biennale. For this project, the president and director of Sharjah Art Foundation took over 13 locations across town – “I wanted more but they were like,‘Hey, slow down,’” she laughs – giving new life to spaces such as an abandoned planetarium or a site perilously close to a chaotic cricket stadium. “I think I’ve been doing my job for 18 years now. And although I’m always busy, it’s a great honor to be invited to do these things,” she shares with her tender but assertive voice. “Nobody goes to Pakistan. Everybody goes to India. Everyone keeps saying, ‘Oh, but it’s so dangerous,’ but it’s not risky at all. As a woman, I walked down the street on my own and it was fine – even late at night. The city is so beautiful. Lahore is a place to fall in love with.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi wears jumper, her own; dress, socks, shoes, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; pants, Rochas; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman; earrings, rings, Sohail Abdullah. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

I watch the royal cruising carefree through the Marrakech medina with this same determination, exploring with curiosity a little store that sells rugs and ottomans, followed by a stand with accessories. Although she is the daughter of HH Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, one of the most loved GCC royals, don’t expect her to manifest as a fairytale princess. In fact, Sheikha Al Qasimi hates to be called “princess.” Instead, she is a practical woman, with a great sense of humor, who speaks eight languages and travels carrying her own luggage.“My parents pushed us to learn languages and see the world. That was always part of our upbringing, and we were never raised as royals. We were just raised to do everything ourselves. Even when I was in school and people would say, ‘Oh, so and so’s daughter is studying here…’ I would just sit there rolling my eyes. People didn’t know about us. Why would they?” She reflects when asked how it was to grow up in a royal home. “Our childhood revolved around studying. My mom pushed us. We had tutors after school and on the weekend. We just studied, studied, studied. And I like that. This gave us structure to understand that we have a job that comes with tasks and obligations. And having a job is important, as independence is everything.”

“Having a job is important, as independence is everything”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears jumper, own; dress, socks, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; pants, Rochas; earrings, rings, Sohail Abdullah. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

For Sheikha Al Qasimi, life would probably be easier if she only had “a” job. Instead, her CV is filled with several big titles, and as many hats as one can wear. Along with leading the Sharjah Art Foundation, she serves as the Sharjah Biennial director, playing a pivotal role in positioning the emirate as a revered art hub regionally and internationally. Sheikha Al Qasimi is also president of the Africa Institute of Sharjah and chair of the board for the Sharjah Architecture Triennial, which inaugurated its first edition in November 2019. No less impressive is her role on the board of directors for MoMA PS1 in New York; Kunst-Werke Berlin e. V. in Germany; and Ashkal Alwan in Beirut. The list goes on and on. And let’s not forget her passion projects: she is a proud, self-taught restaurateur, owning Fen and Abayomi restaurants, both in Sharjah. “I’ve always been active mentally, and want to do and learn things. I feel a lot of reward in what I do. I’m exhausted, but it’s worth it,” says the Sheikha. When asked if she considers herself a workaholic, she pauses and smiles, “Oh, definitely. I think it’s good to work.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears dress, Balenciaga; hat, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; necklace, Jean Paul Gaultier. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

While Sheikha Al Qasimi may now be a reference in the art world, she had to prove her talent like anyone else. She tells me she had to work double as hard to establish her points and contest any notions that her job was given to her as a result of family ties. In a previous interview with Vogue Arabia, she shared that when she took over the Sharjah Biennial, founded in 1993 by her father, the event was in desperate need of a revamp, being held in a convention center. At the age of 22, with a handful of staff, she completely redefined the program, moved it to a new location, hung art, and swept the floors herself. “During a trip to Berlin with my father, we visited the Documenta11 contemporary art exhibition. I was inspired by the way contemporary art connected with the real world, politics, and social issues,” she explains. “I wanted to know why our biennial wasn’t looking at things like this. I wanted to see how the process worked in Sharjah. I promised my father I wasn’t going to interfere, but of course, I did. I asked why we were in a trade/expo center, even though we have an arts area. Old Sharjah Biennial was like an art fair, but we’re not a commercial art fair, we’re non- profit and cultural. The organizers quit, so it became my job.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears dress, Balenciaga; hat, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman; rings, Zohra Rahman; pearl ring, Sheikha Hoor’s own. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Today, Sheikha Al Qasimi oversees a staff of 200 and the Sharjah Biennial is consistently rated as one of the top 10 biennials in the world.

The sun is setting in Marrakech, filling the terrace on top of Hassan Hajjaj’s riad with a golden light only found in this city. Although she was photographed the day before, Sheikha Al Qasimi has decided to visit the venue, while Egyptian star Yousra is being shot by the Moroccan photographer, with a live band playing traditional local songs. As we sit in a quieter place, we start discussing her new role as creative director of the London-based menswear brand Qasimi, founded by her twin brother, Sheikh Khaled Al Qasimi, who passed away abruptly last July. “You know, it’s very hard. It’s very emotional. I don’t think that I’ve grieved, to be honest. In the beginning, it was more about looking after my parents and my sisters. He was my twin and we had such a connection… I don’t feel like he’s gone sometimes, and I often dream of Khaled,” she shares. Honoring her brother’s life and passion, she stepped into his shoes, following as closely as possible the five-year plan he left behind. “For me it’s important to make this as successful as I can for him, now that he is gone. It’s hard because although fashion and arts mix, the commercial side is new to me. I’ve always worked in nonprofits; now, it’s different.”

00:00 / 00:00

More than just the business side, Sheikh Khaled’s presence is felt more than ever in the most recent designs, celebrating his life and heritage. One of the best examples is the first collection Sheikha Al Qasimi has overseen, where the rising sun – a motif linked with Sharjah’s iconography – is reinterpreted in some looks, now as a sunset, paired with the sentence “To rise again.” The Sheikha also decided to include two quotes she found on her brother’s mood board, hanging in his office. Written on T-shirts and sweatshirts, the sacred expressions “For I am near” and “We are never parted” are touching and clear reminders that Sheikha Al Qasimi will never forget her twin, and the company is in the best hands possible. “It will always be my brother’s office, my brother’s team, and my brother’s label.”

Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia

Photography Hassan Hajjaj 
Style Katie Trotter & Lisa Jarvis
Creative producer Laura Prior  
Art accomplice Ebon Heath 
Second assistant Tariq Hajjaj
Local producer Marie Courtin 
Hair Sadek Lardjane 
Makeup Jo Frost
Photography assistants Hasnae El Quarga and Meriem Yin
Style assistant Alexandria Lefevre 
Runner Yazid Bezaz, Abdelali Boukrimi, Mohammed Ajib
Studio Riad Yima, Marrakech
With special thanks to Four Seasons Resort Marrakech

Read Next: 10 Life Lessons to Learn from Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi

Journey Through Jaipur, the ‘Pink City’, in Celebration of This Season’s Buzziest Color

00:00 / 00:00

Hello, Jaipur! This summer, Vogue Arabia—and a team of Indian and Arab creatives—took over the streets of the ‘Pink City’ in celebration of the season’s most adored hue. Join Sawai Padmanabh Singh, the Maharaja of Jaipur, rising models Nour Rizk from Lebanon, and Maumita from India on this journey, dripping with love for the color, the culture, and above all, the fashion.

Fashion director: Amine Jreissati
Videography: Gorkey Patwal, Pulkit Karla
Hair and makeup: Kritika Gill
Production: Ankita Chandra, Sam Allison
On-ground production: Film and Locations India, Mithika Gaekwad, Harshaeta Singh
Models: Nour Rizk, Maumita

Get Ready with Salma Abu Deif for Her First Cannes Film Festival Red Carpet

00:00 / 00:00

Before making her first-ever red carpet appearance at Cannes Film Festival, Salma Abu Deif gave Vogue Arabia an exclusive sneak peek behind her look. The Egyptian actor opted for a bold black dress by Pinko, paired with glittering Chopard jewelry, while her beauty look featured sleek hair and a bright red pout.

Watch the video above as Abu Deif shows us how she got ready for the big day.

Production: Koral Communication

Amina Muaddi, Huda Kattan, and Nadine Nassib Njeim in Conversation with Manuel Arnaut

00:00 / 00:00

Behind the scenes of our March 2022 cover was the usual bustle of a Vogue shoot combined with the thrill of our 5th anniversary, which only increased twofold as the three cover stars sat down for a conversation with Manuel Arnaut. The editor-in-chief spoke to accessories designer Amina Muaddi, beauty mogul Huda Kattan, and actor Nadine Nassib Njeim about growing up Arab, the struggles they overcame as women in their industries, what their incredible success feels like, and much more.

Keeping with the celebration of Middle Eastern women representing the region on a global stage in our latest issue, Arnaut began by asking Kattan what makes Arab women unique. “Having grown up outside the Middle East and moving here later on, I was so amazed by the strength and creativity in Arab women,” said the Iraqi-US entrepreneur. “I actually find them to be so passionate and so creative.” Nassib Njeim said, “Now, Arab women are more dedicated to their goals. They want to achieve their dreams. They don’t accept boundaries anymore even though they respect the culture, traditions, and religion. They are proving themselves in many, many fields.” Having lived outside of the Middle East for the majority of her life, Muaddi shared that people were often curious about her heritage. “Usually people are surprised and find it different that I am half-Jordanian-half -Romanian and work in fashion,” she said. “I am so connected to Italy and France but still very very rooted where I come from.”

The world has witnessed the three women achieve great heights in their careers, however, they reveal that a grounded mindset is key to prospering. “Maintaining a scrappy, self-starting type of attitude is very important to get things done,” advises Kattan, who feels only gratitude for her community upon seeing herself in beauty stores across the world. Muaddi adds that she still feels excited when stars including Rihanna, Beyoncé, and Kim Kardashian, wear her shoes. She says, “It’s fundamental to keep that excitement, to keep feeling like you still haven’t achieved what you wanted to, and to be grateful for what you have.” Nassib Njeim, whose moving performances in TV and cinema have touched and inspired so many over the years, shares that she keeps on challenging herself. “When you work with passion, and you have big dreams, and still consider that you are learning, you will always give your best,” she says.

The conversation takes a deep dive into some of the more challenging times in their lives, such as when Nassib Njeim underwent seven hours of surgery due to the Beirut port blast.”Now I’m more attached to my life, to my kids, and to making my dreams come true,” she says when asked about how the tragic incident changed her. The cover stars also discuss living their public lives, how they deal with hate, the best part about being themselves, and their goals for the next five years.

Watch the video above for the full conversation.

Inside Vogue Arabia’s Biggest Issue Ever Celebrating Our 5th Anniversary

00:00 / 00:00

What better way to celebrate our 5th anniversary than by producing our biggest issue ever with 500 pages, and packing them with inspiring and empowering content? Vogue Arabia’s March 2022 issue holds the deeply personal cover stories of three powerhouse Arab women: Amina Muaddi, Huda Kattan, and Nadine Nassib Njeim, and the theme of Arab women taking charge and representing the region on a world stage.

The anniversary issue features conservationist Dame Jane Goodall in conversation with sustainability editor-at-large Livia Firth, talking about why there are still reasons to hope in a world filled with uncertainty. In another inspiring feature, lifelong friends Farida Khelfa and Carla Bruni model the latest couture, while French actor Philippine Leroy-Beaulieu – the iconic Emily in Paris villain – further defies age conventions while showcasing the season’s most striking looks. The edition also salutes Aquazzura on its 10th year in a special shoot with Princess Maria-Olympia of Greece and Denmark, and includes celebratory stories about fashion, entrepreneurs, rising stars, and the region’s biggest talents. Along with all that, the March 2022 issue also shines a spotlight on the new Saudi musicians to listen to now, while model and social entrepreneur Elisa Sednaoui Dellal finally finds her way home to Egypt after two years of a pandemic-enforced separation, in a moving feature where she visits, for the first time ever, one of her architect father’s most personal projects. 

Discover all this and much more in a special teaser video of the issue above, set to the catchy new track ‘Ala Bali’ by Palestinian singer Elyanna, who is also featured in the issue.

Watch Emirati Entrepreneur Salama Mohamed Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Vintage Rolex to Her First Louboutins

00:00 / 00:00

We all have a few treasures in our wardrobes that have either seen the worst and best parts of our lives, have taken a great deal of saving up, or were purchases to come out of a ‘treat yourself’ moment. Whatever the story behind a piece may be, it needs to be told, and what better way than to have them take the spotlight in Vogue Arabia’s brand new video series, ‘My Style Superstars’?

First up, Emirati CEO and founder of skincare brand Peacefull, Salama Mohamed sits down to reveal the four items closest to her heart. Bringing out her vintage Rolex watch she says, “It’s very very old. When I saw it, I bought it for my birthday. One day I’m going to give it to my daughter.” The mother-of-two goes on to share that she gifted herself a pair of black Christian Louboutin pumps after giving birth to her son Khalifa. “It just gave me confidence and the feeling that I can do everything with a nice pair of Louboutins,” she confides. Mohamed also owns two special handbags with significant memories attached to them: a monogrammed Goyard, and a brown Hermès. Watch the video above to know the stories behind them, and stay tuned for more episodes from the series.

Watch Diala Makki Reveal Her Style Superstars, from Her Late Grandmother’s Necklace to a Bisht By Stéphane Rolland

00:00 / 00:00

In the latest episode of ‘My Style Superstars’, TV presenter and journalist Diala Makki takes Vogue Arabia through the most cherished items in her closet.

Proving the power of jewelry that has passed through generations, the first piece revealed by Makki is a gold necklace that is over 100 years old. “I only wear it when I want some positive energy or when I’m about to venture into something new, and I want the protection of my grandmother, may she rest in peace,” confides Makki. The second item—a Class of 2021 cap from her third graduation—comes with an inspiring message from Makki, who completed her second master’s degree, in leadership in media. “It has been a wonderful achievement for myself,” shares Makki. “I really advise all women during different stages in their careers to go back to school. It’s very difficult for them to go back to that sense of discipline, but it taught me a lot, and I think I’m a completely different woman after I graduated.” The third piece is a special bisht with gold threads that was designed by Makki’s friend and renowned designer Stéphane Rolland. “I wore this bisht once, and it is very very dear to me because it was gifted by him,” says the presenter.

Watch the video above for more on what makes these items so special to Makki, and stayed tuned for more episodes.

Watch Zainab Al-Eqabi Reveal Her Style Superstars, from a Graduation Gift to Her Mother’s Necklace

00:00 / 00:00

In the next episode of ‘My Style Superstars’, Zainab Al-Eqabi reveals her wardrobe’s most prized possessions, some of which happen to be gifts given at the most important points in her life.

First up, the para-athlete and presenter brings out her mother’s necklace which once belonged to her grandmother, and was later split into different pieces to be shared with her siblings. “It’s nice to know that I have the same necklace as my sisters,” she shares. Al-Eqabi also holds another jewelry piece gifted by her mother close to her heart. Given to her before she embarked on a year-long master’s course in the UK, the ring features the kahraman stone and served as a reminder of her mother while she was away from home. Al-Eqabi’s next item is sure to strike a chord with all those who have special memories of their first solo travel. Bought at a local Parisian shop during one of her first trips to the city, the bag marked a moment of celebration for Al-Eqabi’s independence. Al-Eqabi treated herself to another bag growing up—this time, after completing her master’s degree, “to tell myself that women should dream, and work hard to achieve their goals.”

Watch the video above to hear all the stories attached to the sentimental pieces in Al-Eqabi’s closet.

March 11, 2020

“Independence is everything” — Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi on Shaping the Artistic Legacy of Sharjah with Courage and Vision

Hard-working and passionate, Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi is shaping the artistic legacy of Sharjah – and her brother – with courage and vision…

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears jumper, Sheikha Hoor’s own; dress, socks, shoes, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; earrings, rings, Sohail Abdullah. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Tick, tick, tick, tick. “Done. My meeting in Sharjah is pushed back and now I can stay one more day,” pronounces Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi, her long, white-painted nails swiping the screen of her phone. Busier than ever, the Emirati royal is in Marrakech for our cover shoot, after spending more than a month in Pakistan, where she curated the second edition of the Lahore Biennale. For this project, the president and director of Sharjah Art Foundation took over 13 locations across town – “I wanted more but they were like,‘Hey, slow down,’” she laughs – giving new life to spaces such as an abandoned planetarium or a site perilously close to a chaotic cricket stadium. “I think I’ve been doing my job for 18 years now. And although I’m always busy, it’s a great honor to be invited to do these things,” she shares with her tender but assertive voice. “Nobody goes to Pakistan. Everybody goes to India. Everyone keeps saying, ‘Oh, but it’s so dangerous,’ but it’s not risky at all. As a woman, I walked down the street on my own and it was fine – even late at night. The city is so beautiful. Lahore is a place to fall in love with.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi wears jumper, her own; dress, socks, shoes, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; pants, Rochas; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman; earrings, rings, Sohail Abdullah. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

I watch the royal cruising carefree through the Marrakech medina with this same determination, exploring with curiosity a little store that sells rugs and ottomans, followed by a stand with accessories. Although she is the daughter of HH Sultan bin Muhammad Al Qasimi, one of the most loved GCC royals, don’t expect her to manifest as a fairytale princess. In fact, Sheikha Al Qasimi hates to be called “princess.” Instead, she is a practical woman, with a great sense of humor, who speaks eight languages and travels carrying her own luggage.“My parents pushed us to learn languages and see the world. That was always part of our upbringing, and we were never raised as royals. We were just raised to do everything ourselves. Even when I was in school and people would say, ‘Oh, so and so’s daughter is studying here…’ I would just sit there rolling my eyes. People didn’t know about us. Why would they?” She reflects when asked how it was to grow up in a royal home. “Our childhood revolved around studying. My mom pushed us. We had tutors after school and on the weekend. We just studied, studied, studied. And I like that. This gave us structure to understand that we have a job that comes with tasks and obligations. And having a job is important, as independence is everything.”

“Having a job is important, as independence is everything”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears jumper, own; dress, socks, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; pants, Rochas; earrings, rings, Sohail Abdullah. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

For Sheikha Al Qasimi, life would probably be easier if she only had “a” job. Instead, her CV is filled with several big titles, and as many hats as one can wear. Along with leading the Sharjah Art Foundation, she serves as the Sharjah Biennial director, playing a pivotal role in positioning the emirate as a revered art hub regionally and internationally. Sheikha Al Qasimi is also president of the Africa Institute of Sharjah and chair of the board for the Sharjah Architecture Triennial, which inaugurated its first edition in November 2019. No less impressive is her role on the board of directors for MoMA PS1 in New York; Kunst-Werke Berlin e. V. in Germany; and Ashkal Alwan in Beirut. The list goes on and on. And let’s not forget her passion projects: she is a proud, self-taught restaurateur, owning Fen and Abayomi restaurants, both in Sharjah. “I’ve always been active mentally, and want to do and learn things. I feel a lot of reward in what I do. I’m exhausted, but it’s worth it,” says the Sheikha. When asked if she considers herself a workaholic, she pauses and smiles, “Oh, definitely. I think it’s good to work.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears dress, Balenciaga; hat, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; necklace, Jean Paul Gaultier. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

While Sheikha Al Qasimi may now be a reference in the art world, she had to prove her talent like anyone else. She tells me she had to work double as hard to establish her points and contest any notions that her job was given to her as a result of family ties. In a previous interview with Vogue Arabia, she shared that when she took over the Sharjah Biennial, founded in 1993 by her father, the event was in desperate need of a revamp, being held in a convention center. At the age of 22, with a handful of staff, she completely redefined the program, moved it to a new location, hung art, and swept the floors herself. “During a trip to Berlin with my father, we visited the Documenta11 contemporary art exhibition. I was inspired by the way contemporary art connected with the real world, politics, and social issues,” she explains. “I wanted to know why our biennial wasn’t looking at things like this. I wanted to see how the process worked in Sharjah. I promised my father I wasn’t going to interfere, but of course, I did. I asked why we were in a trade/expo center, even though we have an arts area. Old Sharjah Biennial was like an art fair, but we’re not a commercial art fair, we’re non- profit and cultural. The organizers quit, so it became my job.”

VOGUE ARABIA COVER MARCH 2020 Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi. Photography: Hassan Hajjaj

Sheikha Hoor wears dress, Balenciaga; hat, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux; glasses, Andy Wahloo Super-Lux X Poppy Lissiman; rings, Zohra Rahman; pearl ring, Sheikha Hoor’s own. Photographed by Hassan Hajjaj for Vogue Arabia March 2020

Today, Sheikha Al Qasimi oversees a staff of 200 and the Sharjah Biennial is consistently rated as one of the top 10 biennials in the world.

The sun is setting in Marrakech, filling the terrace on top of Hassan Hajjaj’s riad with a golden light only found in this city. Although she was photographed the day before, Sheikha Al Qasimi has decided to visit the venue, while Egyptian star Yousra is being shot by the Moroccan photographer, with a live band playing traditional local songs. As we sit in a quieter place, we start discussing her new role as creative director of the London-based menswear brand Qasimi, founded by her twin brother, Sheikh Khaled Al Qasimi, who passed away abruptly last July. “You know, it’s very hard. It’s very emotional. I don’t think that I’ve grieved, to be honest. In the beginning, it was more about looking after my parents and my sisters. He was my twin and we had such a connection… I don’t feel like he’s gone sometimes, and I often dream of Khaled,” she shares. Honoring her brother’s life and passion, she stepped into his shoes, following as closely as possible the five-year plan he left behind. “For me it’s important to make this as successful as I can for him, now that he is gone. It’s hard because although fashion and arts mix, the commercial side is new to me. I’ve always worked in nonprofits; now, it’s different.”

00:00 / 00:00

More than just the business side, Sheikh Khaled’s presence is felt more than ever in the most recent designs, celebrating his life and heritage. One of the best examples is the first collection Sheikha Al Qasimi has overseen, where the rising sun – a motif linked with Sharjah’s iconography – is reinterpreted in some looks, now as a sunset, paired with the sentence “To rise again.” The Sheikha also decided to include two quotes she found on her brother’s mood board, hanging in his office. Written on T-shirts and sweatshirts, the sacred expressions “For I am near” and “We are never parted” are touching and clear reminders that Sheikha Al Qasimi will never forget her twin, and the company is in the best hands possible. “It will always be my brother’s office, my brother’s team, and my brother’s label.”

Originally published in the March 2020 issue of Vogue Arabia

Photography Hassan Hajjaj 
Style Katie Trotter & Lisa Jarvis
Creative producer Laura Prior  
Art accomplice Ebon Heath 
Second assistant Tariq Hajjaj
Local producer Marie Courtin 
Hair Sadek Lardjane 
Makeup Jo Frost
Photography assistants Hasnae El Quarga and Meriem Yin
Style assistant Alexandria Lefevre 
Runner Yazid Bezaz, Abdelali Boukrimi, Mohammed Ajib
Studio Riad Yima, Marrakech
With special thanks to Four Seasons Resort Marrakech

Read Next: 10 Life Lessons to Learn from Sheikha Hoor Al Qasimi

Recent Videos

Suggestions
Articles
View All
Vogue Collection
Topics